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THE GOWLAND

AWARDS

2019 Nominations Open Now

The Gowland Awards, a night of cocktails and canapés!

The awards will be an an irreverent evening of cocktails, canapés and catcalls to call out the worst remarks made in the DV field and to reward those who make a positive difference to domestic violence awareness and prevention. ‘Coalface’ workers and practitioners will have the opportunity to judge the worst domestic violence deniers across a number of dubious award categories. Attendees will be invited to “Howl for the Gowl”, where the loudest howls, boos and hisses will decide the winner.

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There’s a lot more public awareness about domestic violence these days, but if you work with its survivors you’d know there’s still a long way to go. Not only do you witness firsthand its impact on the women and children in your care, but you’ll also hear outrageous comments and excuses in the media and community that trivialise domestic violence and those it affects.

So, where do you turn to let off steam and have your say?

This November, the inaugural Gowland Awards offer an opportunity to denounce domestic violence deniers.

It’s your chance to gather with peers for an irreverent evening to lampoon negative representations of domestic violence, and recognise excellence in raising awareness of the issue.

THE AWARD CATEGORIES

The Best

EXCELLENCE IN DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AWARENESS

ACTS OF RESISTANCE

RECOGNISING ACTS OF SURVIVORS’ STRENGTH

2017 Winner

Rebecca Gibney

2016 Winner

Andrew O’Keefe

2017 Winner

Leichhardt Women’s Community Health Centre for nominating their client.

2016 Winner

Dixie Link-Gordon for nominating a young Aboriginal woman and the Redfern All Blacks Women Football Team.

WORST SURVIVOR VICTIM BLAMING

MOST TRIVIAL OR PATRONISING REMARK ABOUT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

MOST INACCURATE STATEMENT ABOUT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

2017 Winner

“I immediately threw a single punch with my right hand” – Sergeant Berry, the Queensland police officer who responded to his neighbour’s call for helping during a domestic violence incident by punching her in the face and taking out an AVO against her.

2016 Winners

“She put the peas on the wrong side of the plate” – de-identified “Children are used as pawns in custody battles where women make frivolous claims and believe they have the sole right to the children. Children have two parents and, until we treat mums and dads with the same courtesy and rights, we will continue to see murders due to sheer frustration and depression and mental illness caused by this unworkable system” – Pauline Hanson

2017 Winner

The police officers who were called to the house of Indigenous single mother Ms Dhu over a domestic violence incident but instead arrested her over $3,900 of unpaid fines. She later died after 3 days in police custody.

2016 Winner

“How does DV leave stop DV exactly? If anything it encourages it, or at least false reports. ‘Divvie’ the new ‘sickie.’ Another union rort” – Miranda Devine

2017 Winner

Gregory Riddett, a social worker and counsellor specialising in domestic violence for saying “there are double standards at play when it comes to domestic assault. We have, he argues, invested too heavily in a gendered model of family violence. Simplistic feminist assumptions about male power and female oppression just perpetuate old stereotypes.”

2016 Winner

“Violence against women does discriminate starkly. It is concentrated in communities with a high indigenous population, in the Northern Territory, in impoverished rural towns, in the urban fringes where the underclass lives, where welfare has emasculated men, where unemployment is high and education poor, and where drug and alcohol abuse is rife. These are the obvious preconditions for violence” – Miranda Devine

“We devised the Awards to give a voice to front-line workers who deal with the banal reality of domestic violence every day. We wanted to raise awareness even further of the seriousness of domestic violence. ‘DV’ remains trivialised despite the recent increase in awareness but it won’t be fully accepted as an issue until its prevalence and seriousness is accepted as real. The denial of domestic violence is overt, covert, and insidious.”

Lyndal Gowland